Carrot & Orange Cake

From Issue 10 of News from the Kitchen

 

Raw Carrot and Orange Cake

For the cake

  • 3 cups carrots, finely grated
  • 2 cups pecans, ground in a food processor
  • 1/4 cup raisins, roughly chopped
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon mixed spice*
  • Date paste**
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon orange zest
  • 1/2 cup desiccated coconut

* Mixed spice is a blend of cinnamon, coriander seed, caraway, nutmeg, ginger and cloves. If you’re in the United States, you can use pumpkin pie spice.

** Make the date paste by grinding 1 cup soft dates and 1/2 cup orange juice in a food processor until smooth.

  1. Thoroughly mix all ingredients together in a large bowl.
  2. Shape into individual cakes or press into one large cake, ready to be cut at the end.
  3. Place on a dehydrator sheet and dehydrate at 115 degrees F for 8 – 12 hours. If you don’t have a dehydrator, you can simply place the cake into the fridge to set.

 

For the frosting

  • 1 1/2 cup cashews
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 tablespoons coconut nectar or honey
  • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  1. Blend all ingredients in a high-speed blender until smooth.
  2. Place in fridge to achieve a thicker consistency and spread on cake when you’re ready to serve.
  3. Garnish cake with nutmeg.

261 Comments

  1. Michela
    Reply
    Posted

    Really good flavours and a good chew unlike “normal, cooked” cakes! Delicious. Thank you for your excellent recipes, we really appreciate them.

  2. Roxanne
    Reply
    Posted

    Namaste! Russell, can I just use my vitamix for the date paste and not the food processor?
    It would be easier!

  3. Angie
    Reply
    Posted

    I love this carrot cake. I too, did not put in the dehydrator. My friends request this cake each year for their birthdays. 🙂

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      It’s been a while since I made this, so I honestly can’t remember. But just make it as thick as the slice in the pic 🙂

      Dehydrate at 115 degrees F.

      • Louise
        Reply
        Posted

        I’ve just bought some commercial coconut flour (raw – a decent brand) and realise that it is completely different to ground dried coconut flakes as it has been defatted and is really really fine and dry. I’m not sure now what you are suggesting above when you say that coconut flour would be a good sub for the 2 cups pecans. Should I try 1) 2 cups coconut flakes, then grind them (this would weigh probably half of 2 cups pecans), 2) 2 cups ground coconut flakes, 3) 2 cups commercial flour or……… What do you suggest. Would love a professional opinion!! At a guess I’d go for 4 cups coconut flakes which I estimate will be the same weight as 2 cups pecans, but I’m only guessing (I’m a mathematician not a chef!)

        Would also love some recipes for the commercial stuff which appears to be getting popular but for which there are very few recipes lying around.

        • Russell
          Reply
          Posted

          Hey Louise, I think that answer was specifically to someone who didn’t want to use nuts, so I had limited options. Coconut flour would work still. It’s not really a weight issue, it’s a volume thing.

          What kind of commercial stuff are you seeing that you’d like recipes for? Maybe I can create a few things 🙂

          • Louise
            Reply
            Posted

            The commercially available raw coconut flour I’m talking of is defatted and very fine and dry. I believe that it may be the coconut equivalent to nut pulp flour in the sense that it is made from the coconut fibres mainly with the greater part of the fats removed. It is far far drier and higher in fibre than ground coconut flakes (meal). You will have seen defatted almond flour on the market I’m sure. It’s the commercial coconut equivalent to that. Surkin make it, as do Groovy Foods (it’s a new product) and there is another brand called Coconut Secrets I think too. I have a pack of the Groovy Food stuff.
            It is popular I think because of the Paleo craze. And all the recipes I find are horrid,- full of eggs and butter. I think we’ll be seeing a lot more of these defatted nut flours around. I imagine the commercial almond flours would work fine in place of almond pulp flour.
            I wouldn’t dare try and bake with the Groovy Food coconut flour I’ve bought. I rarely dare to bake anyway. I tend to theorise…..I’ve nevertheless used it stirred into porridge and smoothie and other desserts. It is gorgeous. It is almost like a protein power really in texture – and, probably, nutrients.
            Please do get in there Russell and beat the rest of the UK vegan food world into creating something and delicious with it. You might also like to write blog about it, pointing out the difference between these commercial nut flours, and whole nut meals. I imagine the nearest you could get to a home made equivalent of the commercial coconut flour would come about it you made a nut milk by blending raw coconut flakes and water, straining off the pulp, dehydrating it then grinding finely. I make porridge quality coconut milk like this all the time (it is very cheap) and always use the meal wet (put back in porridge usually or on fresh fruit salad or whatever).
            So get yourself some raw coconut flour (the groove Food stuff is £3.50 for 500 g in Tesco – other brands are far far dearer) and make us something lovely. Show those Paleo guys that you don’t need eggs and butter to have cake.
            There’s a raw food cake making chef around somewhere who uses coconut flour in all her creations. I can’t remember her name but will look her up now.
            If you read this you’re a brave man.

            • Louise
              Reply
              Posted

              This is to follow the long comment I’ve just written you,
              Lady who uses coconut flour a lot is Caroline Fibaek. She has a raw cake book.
              I’m 50 in a few weeks so please make me a raw coconut flour cake. I’ll join your fan club if you do,
              X

              • Louise
                Reply
                Posted

                There are a number of manufacture around (Ie Holland and Barrett) who sell ‘almond flour’ but it’s actually almond meal. Someone needs to write a law to sort out the latest raw food vocabulary.

            • Russell
              Reply
              Posted

              Hey Louise, I think I may have mislead you 🙂

              I’m totally familiar with coconut flour and use it in various recipes. I’ve used it in swiss roll pastry, as well as a new naan bread that I’m just about to post. Keep an eye out for that one 🙂

              • Louise
                Reply
                Posted

                Fantastic. Sorry, I didn’t realise I was preaching to the converted. You asked me above for a description of the commercial coconut flour I had, which I thought meant that you were unfamiliar with such a product and and wanted an explanation as to what it was. I was surprised I admit! So many peoples equate nut flours with nut meal. And fair enough! People can call it what they like so long as they make clear what they are using. Do you call ‘meal’ ‘flour’? And ‘oil’ ‘oil’ or’butter’ ? And ‘butter’ ‘manna’? Or ‘butter’? The terminology is in a mess. Please clean it up for us and write some laws. You are boss.

                So yes, post your stuff. Looking forward to it very much.

                And please too realise that I have my tongue firmly between my teeth when I rant and that I’m actually giggling as I write and assume that because you are British that you can relate to it.

                I’m not mad honestly. Just a theoretical physicist – and I need everything defined precisely or I can’t function.

        • Louise
          Reply
          Posted

          Ok I’m going to guess that 4 cups whole large coconut flakes will give the same amount of meal as 2 cups pecans after grinding. Commercial defatted coconut flour will be far too dry. I wouldn’t have a clue how much to use.

  4. Paul
    Reply
    Posted

    This recipe is beautiful! I made it with no dehydrater – just in the fridge – and it was really delicious. Great flavours!! Thank you

  5. Barbara Holland
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi could you let me know which food dehydrator you would recommend, can’t wait to get started but don’t wish to waste my money on a bad buy. Thanks for your help.

      • Judy
        Reply
        Posted

        Hi Russell,
        I need to get a dehydrator. It’ll be used in my small house, so I was thinking of getting one that’s quiet and stainless steel. That seems to be the TSM you used to recommend. I think a machine with a sound would keep me awake at night. But I’m concerned that the temperature setting on the TSM is difficult & imprecise.
        So, are you only using the Excalibur 9 tray with a timer now? What do you recommend for me, wanting very quiet and preferring stainless steel?
        Thank you!!

        • Russell
          Reply
          Posted

          Hey Judy, Excalibur do a stainless steel one now, so the next one I buy will be that. They don’t make a huge amount of noise – it’s just a small fan. But everyone’s tolerance is different to noise.

          • Judy
            Reply
            Posted

            So you think that the Excalibur stainless steel is better than the TSM?

            I’ve always heard that Excalibur dehydrators are very noisy.

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  7. Hans Ruch
    Reply
    Posted

    I’m new to this site and I think it’s awesome. I have been making carrot cakes, or cup cakes for the past few months after not wanting to waste my carrot juicer pulp. I just made-up a recipe and it is pretty close to yours. I’m happy you shared the recipe for the frosting though, as I have never come up with something I really loved. I have been using coconut butter and no cashews. So, thank you.

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