Chia Seed Bread

Raw Chia Bread

A simple raw bread recipe, loaded with nutrients from the chia seed

I read somewhere that the word “chia” is the ancient Mayan word for “strength”, which means that this is strength bread and any sandwiches made from it are strength sandwiches 😉

There’s a reason chia has become so popular in the last few years (aside from the strength thing).  It’s loaded with Omega 3 fatty acids, calcium, manganese, magnesium and phosphorus.

All this and the fact that calorie for calorie, they are the most nutrient  dense food for several of these important nutrients.

This is also a great recipe if you’re looking to make good use of the almond pulp leftover from almond milk.  Personally, I made the almond pulp for this recipe, so I had almond ‘left over’.  That will quickly be dispatched making this Turmeric Tea, swapping out the hot water for almond milk.

Recipe

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 medium peeled courgette (zucchini), roughly chopped
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 medium onion
  • ¼ cup nutritional yeast
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup chia flour (ground chia seeds)
  • 1 ½ cups almond flour or 2 cups almond pulp (from almond milk)
  • 3 tablespoons psyllium powder
  1. Blend the olive oil, peeled courgette, water, onion, nutritional yeast, lemon juice and salt in a highspeed blender.
  2. Grind the chia flour, almond flour/pulp and psyllium powder in a food processor for a few seconds, then pour in the blended mixture from step one, grinding until a batter is formed.
  3. Spread the batter on 2 nonstick dehydrator sheets about ½ cm (⅕ of an inch) thick.
  4. Dehydrate for around 4 hours at 105 degrees F.
  5. Remove the nonstick sheet and cut the bread into 8 individual slices (4 per tray) and return to the dehydrator, just on the mesh sheets this time, for another 8 hours, or until you’re happy with the texture.

In the picture, I served these sandwiches with last week’s Smashed Chickpea and Sweetcorn Salad, fresh tomatoes and green leaves. I also really love spreading a little coconut oil on the bread as ‘butter’. The taste works beautifully with the salad and bread.

j

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49 Comments

  1. joe welcome
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi James!

    I am wondering what is the function of the olive oil in this recipe, is it to give more flexibility like flour wrap?

    I’ve tried without and it breaks!

  2. jeff
    Reply
    Posted

    Once you grind that chia up, it’s oxidizing rapidly. Omega 3 oils are extremely heat, air, and light sensitive.
    Might be better to keep them whole. They supposedly digest well whole. The seed shell is thin enough, they say.

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Thanks, Jeff. From a culinary perspective, grinding them holds the bread together, although I haven’t actually tried to use whole seeds for this.

  3. Mia Koroua
    Reply
    Posted

    I put this in the dehydrator a couple of hours ago!! Remembered after I’d spread it out that I forgot to add salt to the recipe… So I sprinted some ontop ?? also misread the temperature and had it on 150f for the first hour… ? This is my first attempt at raw bread so I’m glad I got passed the fear and actually did it! Thanks Raw Chef

      • Mia Koroua
        Reply
        Posted

        Hi Russel, I don’t know if you got my reply yesterday. Just wanted to say that the bread came out great, i’d dehydrate it for another hour as I took it out about 45 minutes too early, i’d also not use the oil. I’d love to have more lessons with you if you’re available in any way – I live in Cyprus which is an island in the Mediterranean but I’d love to learn from you. Thanks again!

        • Russell
          Reply
          Posted

          Hey Mia, glad you loved it!

          If you take a look at the courses page we have a really good selection of online courses to get stuck into 🙂

  4. Kasi
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell:

    Love all your flat-bread recipes ! This particular Chia flat-bread, would it OK to use coconut flour as this is what I have in my pantry at the moment.? Thanks.

  5. Christina Young
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell , I have tried using almond pulp/flour as well as coconut flour for raw breads and find them very difficult to digest. Any othe suggestions? I’m thinking about grinding dehydrated sprouted buckwheat …

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      You could just leave it out. The only thing I’d sub for would be avocado, but then you’re getting another fat.

  6. madeline bailey
    Reply
    Posted

    Thanks for this recipe; sounds & looks yummy. Chia is definitely my best friend these days. as I’m trying to lose weight. Mostly due to something about pulling toxins out of the liver via the digestive system?

  7. Mary Kay Simoni
    Reply
    Posted

    Thank you ever so much for your recipes. I will no longer be using nutritional yeast though and have opted to use a little chickpea miso combined with coconut aminos to give the same flavor. I stopped using the nutritional yeast because of all the natural MSG in it AND because they add in folic acid (synthetic) and use cyanocobalamin instead of the methylcobalaSomin (B12-more readily absorbed) thought some of your readers might be interested in this substitution.

  8. Alison rowles-anobile
    Reply
    Posted

    Thank you very much for making so many wonderful recipes available for free. This is a true blessing for those of us who are retired and on very limited incomes, but doing our best to remain healthy and active and continuing to learn! You tick all the boxes and get stars in your crown for all the good work you do in educating people to the benefits and joy of raw food.

  9. Pat Mackenzie
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell.
    when the slices of bread are regurned to the dehydrator for a further 8 hours, is it still the same temperature?

  10. Charmaine Calvert
    Reply
    Posted

    I love your cracker recipes! Thank you for this new chia seed one. Have you tried making this recipe without the olive oil or do you think it would work without the oil? I am trying to remove nutrient poor, calorie dense foods from my diet, like oils and replacing them with whole foods like nuts, seeds and avocados. Thank you Russel.

  11. Anna Brosnan
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell,

    Im not good with chia seeds or flaxseeds. Is there another nut that can replace the chia to have with the almond meal like cashews or another type of nut?

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      The chia is there as a binder, so there’s not really anything that would do the same thing, but you may well find that cashews and a little extra psyllium will do the trick.

  12. Carolyn Bailey
    Reply
    Posted

    Thank you for this recipe. My eyes cannot see the recipe because the type color is too light. Even in this field I can barely see it.

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Hey Carolyn, thanks for your feedback. No one else has mentioned it, so I’m wondering if it’s a brightness thing on your screen? Not sure what you were referring to when you said, “even in this field”?

      • Christine Birch
        Reply
        Posted

        Hi Russell. I agree with Carolyn. Although it the grey colour of the print looks good, I find it difficult to read as well 🙁

        • Russell
          Reply
          Posted

          Hey Christine, thanks so much for letting me know, I’ll get my developers to look at it and see what we can do.

      • Carolyn Bailey
        Reply
        Posted

        Thanks Russell for your consideration. So, as I said, beside the lovely photo of the Chia Sandwich the recipe that’s printed isn’t clearly visible. I can read everything else just fine. Yes, I can turn up the brightness, but then the light hurts my eyes; and even then the print is still too light, though I can read it better.
        What I meant by “even in this field” is that in this comment box the lettering is faint also.
        You are such an inspiration. You should be proud of your work. I wish you the best.

        • Russell
          Reply
          Posted

          Hey Crolyn, thanks so much for your comments. Someone else mentioned after you too, so I’m having my developer take a look at changing the colour of the text.

  13. Vicky
    Reply
    Posted

    Thank you for your recipies!!!
    Please, in my country we don’t have psyllium husk.
    What can I use instead of it?
    Thanks again!

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      You can use a little Irish moss, but you’re likely not to have that either, so I think you’ll be OK if you just leave it out.

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