Kitchari

Kitchari Recipe

Kitchari (kich-ah-ree) is one of my favourite hearty, warming dishes.  

It’s roots are in Ayurveda where is used as a balancing recipe for the body, as well as being restorative to digestion, because it heals and smoothes the intestinal wall.

It’s extremely nourishing and can be used when feeling under the weather, as a cleanse – only eating this dish for 1 to 3 days – or just when you need something comforting.

White rice is used in the recipe, as it’s easier to digest, but if digestion isn’t your issue and you’re not sick or using this for a cleanse, then brown rice will supply more nutrients, as it has the husk intact still.

It’s really important to use split yellow mung dal beans, which may also be known as mung dal.  They look similar to several other legumes, but it’s only the mung dal that will not produce any intestinal bloating.

If you’re looking for the ultimate in soothing digestive meals, pair Kitcahri with Lionheart Herbs Digest Tea, which can be found by clicking here.

Ingredients

Kitchari Recipe

Serves 2 to 4

  • 1 cup split yellow mung dal beans
  • ¼ – ½ cup long grain white or white basmati rice
  • 2 tablespoons coconut oil
  • 2 tablespoons fresh ginger root
  • 2 teaspoon each: black mustard seeds, cumin, and turmeric powder
  • 1 teaspoon each: coriander powder, fennel, fenugreek seeds
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 3 cloves
  • 3 bay leaves
  • 1 sheet kombu
  • 6 cups water
  • Juice of 2 limes
  • Kale
  • Bok Choi
  • 1 small handful chopped fresh cilantro leaves
  • ½ tsp salt

Method

Kitchari Recipe
  1. Wash split yellow mung dal beans and rice together until water runs clear.
  2. In a preheated large pot, melt the coconut oil and add  the ginger and mustard seeds, until the seeds start to pop.
  3. Add all of the spices (except the bay leaves) on medium heat and stir for 20 to 30 seconds, so as not to burn them.  This will get the most flavour out of them.
  4. Add dal and rice and stir, coating the rice and beans with the spices.
  5. Add water, lime juice, bay leaves and kombu and bring to a boil.
  6. Boil for 5 minutes.
  7. Add in the kale and bok choi
  8. Turn heat to low, cover pot and continue to cook until dal and rice become soft (about 30-40 minutes).
  9. The cilantro leaves can be added just before serving.
  10. Add the salt at the end of cooking, so as not to affect the softening of the dal.

j

FREE PDF DOWNLOAD

Click Here to Download the Recipe PDF

Just click here and enter your name & email

25 Comments

  1. Tricia
    Reply
    Posted

    Are split yellow mung dal beans the same as split yellow moong dal? Also, how much kale and bok choi do you recommend? One more question: how much difference will using yellow mustard seeds make rather than using black mustard seeds?

    Thanks!

  2. Apurvo SutherlandI
    Reply
    Posted

    This looks amazing and I am going to make it now. I am wondering if I add the salt I with the spices or at the end. I believe sometimes salt can interfere with beans getting soft and I notice the salt is the last ingredient on the list and then you say to add salt to taste. Is that add more salt to taste and add the salt you recommended with the spices or wait till the end? Thank you so much for this recipe. Making this for some healing for some friends coming to my birthday dinner tonight 💞💜💕

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Hey Appurvo, yes you’re right, you’d want to add the salt in at the end so as not to affect the cooking of the beans.

      • Lily
        Reply
        Posted

        salt actually helps to soften dried beans and legumes! the lime juice should be added after cooking, because it’s acidity that can prevent dried beans and legumes from softening. i just tried this recipe and my peas stayed crunchy even after being in the slow cooker for 8 hours 🙁

        • Russell
          Reply
          Posted

          Traditionally salt is added to the end of dals for the reason of making the beans too tough, although there is some controversy about it being an old wines’ tale.

          With regards to cooking, slow cooking is different because it doesn’t get up to the temperature that cooking in the way I described in the recipe does. There’s no issue adding lime juice while cooking this way. Did you use mung dal beans?

  3. katrina Toucke
    Reply
    Posted

    Russell on this rainy day in Colorado (very rare) this looks amazing.I think I will try with a vegi rice. I was thinking even turnip, cauliflower might be a bit to gassy, or even daikon? What do you think. I am trying to stay away from Carbs.

    Thanks so much!! Love your recipes!

    Katrina

  4. Colleen Byron
    Reply
    Posted

    Got cha. I tend to think of those more as strips, but I understand what you mean now. I am actually eating a strip/sheet of kombu in the beans I am having now. I always throw a couple strips into beans when I prepare them. Thanks!

    Colleen

  5. Catherine Gelinas
    Reply
    Posted

    I have no words to tell you how good this is , I could roll my whole self into this meal !!!!! Love and admiration from cold Montreal !!!!

  6. Helen
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell,

    Is white rice better than brown for this recipe?

    Is it just a ‘taste thing’, or is there another reason?

    Thanks,

    Helen x

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      You’re right, thanks 🙂 I’ve taken off the asterisk, because I included what I wanted to say about the mung dal in the intro.

  7. S Colleen
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell,

    This recipe looks terrific and I am looking forward to trying it. I have one question. In my experience Nori comes in sheets and Kombu comes in pieces of different lengths, widths and thickness. Can you suggest another measure for the Kombu, or is the idea really just to add some and not worry to much about the amount as long as it isn’t a speck or the whole pack?

    Thanks!

    Colleen

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Hey Colleen, have you seen them in sticks? When you wet those sticks, they unfurl as a sheet of about 20cm by 20cm.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Want to incorporate raw food into
everyday living?

Check out my online Raw Food Academy Courses below

Weekday Raw

Raw Chef at Home

Raw Desserts at Home

Raw Chocolate

Raw Fermentation

Raw Food Styling