Mediterranean Almond Bread

If you were at the last Fresh Network open day, you may have seen me demonstrating how to make herb bread and how to use the bread to make a sandwich. Well, I’ve come up with a new bread recipe and I have to say, it’s even better! You are the first to know about this recipe, as I only took the first batch out of the dehydrator this morning and I’m feeling particularly satisfied now as I’ve just polished off a sandwich fit for Scooby Doo!!!

I love making this bread as it’s so satisfying to create and eat. You can make a batch of this on Sunday and be set up for some fantastic lunchtime sarnies for the week, instead of just taking the salad option! I like to make a sandwich with avocado, lambs lettuce, tomato and cashew mayonnaise. If you like mushrooms, then some chunky slices of portabello mushrooms marinated in nama ahoyu or tamari make an excellent addition too.

So here’s the recipe …

Mediterranean Almond Bread

Makes 18 ‘slices’

  • 1/2 cup olive oil
  • 1 cup sun-dried tomatoes, loosely packed
  • 3 medium courgettes (zucchini), peeled and  roughly chopped
  • 2 apples, cored and roughly chopped
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 3 tablespoons Herbs de Provence or herbs of your choice
  • 2 tablespoons marjoram or herbs of your choice
  • 3 cups almond flour*
  • 1 cup flax meal

*You can make almond flour a number of ways. My favourite is to save the pulp from any almond milk I make and dehydrate it so I can keep it in a glass jar until needed. You could also use the almond pulp wet. Another way would be just to grind some almonds into flour in a high-powered blender or coffee mill.

  1. Process the olive oil, sun-dried tomatoes, courgette, apple, lemon juice, salt and dried herbs until thoroughly mixed.
  2. Add the almond flour and process again until a batter is formed.
  3. In a bowl, mix the batter with the flax meal by hand. The reason you do this separately (not in the processor) is that you are likely to have too much mixture for the size of the processor at this point. When you add the flax meal, the mixture will become quite heavy and sticky and could overwork your machine.
  4. When mixed, process the whole batter in the machine again in small batches to achieve a light fluffy texture.
  5. Divide the mixture in 2 and place on nonstick dehydrator sheets on dehydrator trays.
  6. Use an offset spatula (aka offset palette knife or cranked palette knife) to spread the mixture evenly to all 4 sides and corners of the nonstick sheet. If the mixture is too sticky, you can wet the spatula to make things easier. Score the whole thing into 9 squares with a knife.
  7. Dehydrate for 2 hours at 105 degrees F. Then remove the nonstick sheets by placing another dehydrator tray and mesh on top and invert so that your original sheet of bread is upside down. That will allow you to peel the nonstick sheet off and continue to dehydrate the underside of the bread.
  8. Dehydrate for approx 8 hours more at 105 degrees F (do this overnight so you’re not tempted to eat it before it’s ready) or until bread feels light in your hand. If the pieces don’t fully come apart where you scored, use a knife to cut them.

So there you have it … Once you have this bread, the only limit you have is your imagination. I have made bread before and used lasagne leftovers to create ‘cheese and tomato’ sarnies, one of my all-time childhood faves! Let me know your favorite fillings!!! 🙂

j

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105 Comments

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      You can leave it out, yes. I wouldn’t substitute with an animal broth because of the possibility of that ingredient going bad at room temperature.

  1. kamala Fordham
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell- do you have a replacement for flax and chia seeds in your bread or cracker recipes? Thanks- your recipes look great but there are ingredients I can’t do at this time

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Hey Kamala, those ingredients are there to bind and there’s nothing else similar that comes to mind. You might try making this bread without them and see how you get on.

  2. Chrissie
    Reply
    Posted

    Russell, I made the bread a couple of days ago and it is delicious!!!! Thx!!! How do I store it by the way? Do I need to refrigerate it or is it ok to keep on the kitchen counter in a sealed container?

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Hey Chrissie, I’m so glad you love it. It depends on how dry you made it. I like it still a little moist, so you’ll ideally want it in a sealed container in the fridge. If it was drier like crackers, room temperature would be OK.

  3. Cynthia Howard
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell, I have been searching for a raw sandwich bread and want to try your recipe. I don’t have a dehydrator, can I just use my oven on its lowest temperature which is 108?

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      You can, but you’ll need to keep an eye on it. You may find that the edges dry much quicker than the centre, so get the bread cut as early as you can.

      It helps if your oven has a fan-assisted setting. More on that here.

  4. Connie
    Reply
    Posted

    Awesome recipe! I did not have any Herbs de Provence on hand so I used what I did have on hand which was 1T Fines Herbs and 2 T Italian Seasoning. With the sun-dried tomatoes and the oregano in the Italian Seasoning the finished product had had me thinking “Pizza!” with every bite. So next time I am going to make 2 discs ( I am hoping they will dry well enough without scoring, or I could pre-cut the slices) and then try my luck at a raw pizza. I’m sure it will work well with a bit of tomato sauce, some nut cheeses and assorted vegetables such as onions, peppers, chick peas, olives, tomatoes, maybe a fermented veg, and herbs like basil and more oregano. I am debating on having everything crunchy and fresh, or marinating the vegetables, or drying a little longer after assembling the pizza.

  5. thecuriousculinarian
    Reply
    Posted

    Is it at all possible to replace the almond flour with coconut flour obviously on a much reduced basis given the absorbency of coconut flour? It is just that my son can not tolerate nuts or buckwheat – I came across this recipe from your buckwheat bread recipe! Do you have any other suggestions in place of almond or buckwheat flour? Thanks so much.

  6. Martica
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi,
    Is it possible to use something that’s not processed instead of 1/2 cup of olive oil…cashews? avocado? And if so, how much..

    thanks! My dad is on a raw diet for medical reasons and I’m trying to figure out things to make him.

  7. Michaël Lebrun
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russell! 🙂 Thank you for this 🙂 If I have a really good food processor can I put the flax in there or do I still need to do it by hand? Thank you 🙂

    • Amy
      Reply
      Posted

      The issues isn’t whether you have a good food processor, it’s the quantity; it will be too much for the capacity of your processor jug. But if you have a large processor, like over 2.5-3L then you might get away with it. Give it a shot, worst case scenario is that it’s too much and you have to remove it from the jug and do it by hand. 🙂

  8. Amelia Trankalis
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi Russel,

    I love you site! Just a few questions; If I replace the flax with chia, do I stir it in dry? I have tried a few recipes with sun dried tomatoes, but use store bought ones and have found the flavour to be quite strong as they pack them with garlic/herbs etc. Do you use store bought ones or home made ones?

    Thanks,
    Amelia

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Yes, you can use dry.

      I buy ones in the store, but they’re not the ones in liquid, so they don’t have any herbs or extra flavours in them. They come semidry in a bag.

  9. jen
    Reply
    Posted

    Thank you for the amazing recipes 🙂 I have an almond allergy and wondering what the nut replacement could be- also steering clear of buckwheat at the moment. Thanks in advance

  10. Reema
    Reply
    Posted

    Hi, I made this last night and followed the recipe (except I had only 1/4th cup olive oil so I added coconut oil to reach the desired measurement). I dehydrated at the temperature stated for the exact time stated, but it turned out to be fragile and slightly wet and crumbly. What did I do wrong?

    • Russell
      Reply
      Posted

      Sounds like you may have spread it too thinly. Also, depending on what part of the world you’re in, you might need to dehydrate longer; if you live in a drier climate, it will dry quicker, and so the opposite is true.

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