Coconut Milk Chia Pudding

Coconut milk chia in a blue bowl with blueberries
Rate This Recipe
4.75 from 4 votes

Coconut Milk Protein Chia Pudding

Servings2

Nutrition (For one serving)

Calories: 245kcalCarbohydrates: 24gProtein: 6gFat: 15gSaturated Fat: 3gSodium: 35mgPotassium: 86mgFiber: 10gSugar: 6gVitamin C: 2mgCalcium: 134mgIron: 2mg

Ingredients

  • ¼ cup chia seeds
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 tbsp coconut butter (not coconut oil)
  • 1/4 cup protein powder
  • 1 tbsp maca (I use gelatinised maca)
  • 10 drops stevia (I like Sweetleaf toffee)
  • ½ tsp lemon juice
  • 1 tsp honey optional
  • 1 pinch salt
  • 1/4 cup frozen blueberries (defrosted with juices)

Instructions

  • Put the chia seed in your serving bowl.
  • The rest of the ingredients (except the blueberries) get blended up in a blender until it forms a milk.
  • Pour the milk over the chia seed and leave for 15 minutes before serving.
  • When ready to serve, top with the blueberries and blueberry juice.
Rate This Recipe
4.75 from 4 votes
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Russell James

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June 11th, 2015

111 thoughts on “Coconut Milk Chia Pudding”

  1. Hi Russell, I am glad that you gave a breakdown of the macronutrients. I really hope that you continue to do so. I am trying to go completely raw because I have diabetes and high blood pressure. I really need to know the carb count, this determines whether I can use a recipe or eliminate some of the things in a recipe or substitute an ingredient for something else.

    Reply
  2. Hey Russell, been a long two year process but I went from vegetarian, to vegan, to whole food plant base and now, Raw/plant base. The ‘no counting anything’ approach is what allowed me to reach my goal by removing enough stress to concentrate on just trying out recipes and keep moving forward. But, I agree that counting might have its place niw that I enjoy 30 minute workouts every day. I seem to run out of steam as the week progresses so, I’m thinking there’s something missing. To make it short, yes, keep the breakdown. It helps. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  3. Hi there! I’ve just signed up to the fermenting at home course so now have access to the site… so starting to have poke around the site, saw recipes, clicked on breakfast and the first one… this chia recipe. And so, it sounds lovely… and i love the idea of this whole raw food thing BUT as soon as I look at the ingredient list I start to get a little nervous about what I’ve signed up for… I’m very very new to all of this so maybe I have a naive view but I kind of find it strange that in amongst these great ingredients there seem to be highly processed ones (protein powder, maca, stevia)… maybe I just don’t understand these ingredients or the role the play but I always wonder ‘would my grandmother know what this is’ whenever i’m checking out ingredients and get a bit nervous when I know she wouldn’t… anyway, I’m hoping Russell might be able to respond to this and set me straight (I’m sorry to raise this broad question here but I wasn’t sure where else to do it!) Cheers!

    Reply
    • Hey Renee, no problem ๐Ÿ™‚

      I don’t consider natural, raw protein powder or Maca to be highly processed. For example, maca is a root, dried and powdered. Your grandmother would probably drink tea, which could be considered a processed food in a similar way, it’s just that it’s more traditional to us to drink tea. If you were in south America, maca would be very traditional to you too. We’re fortunate to discover these new superfoods that have these benefits and get used to using them.

      I can understand why you wouldn’t want stevia. To use the grandmother example again ๐Ÿ™‚ your GM would probably have used sugar here, but sugar is processed and most people agree it’s not good for us. So stevia is an alternative to that. but you can use whatever sweetener you’d like.

      Reply
  4. I totally agree with Neva! I am the last to join the family with a personal trainer as the thought of counting calories was in the two hard box. All I was interested in was eating whole clean foods. This is wonderful, so thank you.
    As an aside – I have just started a program of 2:5 as I need to tone up. The success has been great – for two days I fast on 500 cal. (600 if you are a male) and then eat normal the other 5 days while being aware of the calories but not tied in. Research on this is still new but worth reading more info on.

    Reply
  5. Hi, Russell! I like to have the information available so that I don’t have to spend time figuring it out for myself. I get the information that you have provided plus the amount of fiber on every recipe that I create or get from someone else. I consider the fiber information to be critical; without knowing the fiber content you would think that the chia recipe has too many carbs for many people. Once you subtract the fiber, you realize that the chia seeds are a “good deal” from a carb perspective.

    thanks for the recipe!

    Reply
  6. This is great! I’m a natural raw food competitor, I don’t have a nutritionist, so I find it had to work out my Marcos. Being raw nd trying to build muscle is a serious challenge. So many non raw foodies are against what I’m doing and say that I will not gain the look I want. I train so hard, but just don’t get the definition I desire. I’m not giving up, to see you do this is fantastic! It’s a huge help for me. Please continue with breaking down the macronutients, not just for me but for others out there that may be going through the same thing. Raw foodies that compete need the support, just as other athletes that do not eat raw food do.

    Reply
  7. Hi Russell,

    Thanks for posting this recipe. I make a Chia porridge, but of course, yours sounds better…so I will make it in the morning. Love the added nutritional info…a great touch!

    Reply
  8. I just found out that BOKU might go out of business! they are from California and apparently they not doing well in sales..I am shocked…nice, raw, fermented protein… they also make bars and greens (I never tried). So, Russell if you would like to try…. it might be not much time left…what a shame…

    Reply
  9. Your recipes are awesome, as always. Clarification: it states to blend all the ingredients except blueberries, which I am assuming includes the lemon juice. However, at the end it states to top with blueberries and juice. I am assuming you blend the lemon juice in the blender along with the other ingredients and also sprinkle half-teaspoon of the lemon juice on top of the chia seeds/blueberries? Or do you do one but not the other? Please clarify. Thanks.

    Reply
  10. Hello Russell, i am new to your website although i have been receiving your emails for awhile now. i’m amazed that you (or someone posing as you, ha ha) can respond to almost all of these posts individually. chia seeds are great. with regard to your recipe, does “coconut milk” refer to “coconut water”, i.e., the clear yummy fluid out of young coconuts? or by “milk”, are you meaning coconut water blended with coconut meat to form a more milk-like (and more rich) liquid?

    Reply
  11. Thank you Russell for another amazing looking recipe! Can’t wait to try it:) I also like the addition of the nutritional information. Can you tell me what you used to get the nutritional information? Do you use one program in particular for this information?

    Thanks again, Beth

    Reply
  12. Hi Russell,

    This recipe is awesome! This is a wonderful grain-free alternative breakfast for vegans! Thank you! I would love to post this on my vegan blog, http://gettheglow.wordpress.com
    Would that be alright with you? It would be a link to this recipe on your site and your copyright. Not all the recipes are raw on my blog; some are cooked, but vegans everywhere would love this recipe!
    Very best regards and cheers! Mary Claire

    Reply
  13. thanks for the recipe!! It looks delicious……Just to clarify, is the calorie break down for 2 servings or 1?
    Thank you.

    Reply
  14. Thank you so much for adding the nutritional info to the recipe. I like to keep tabs on how many calories I consume. It helps me to not overeat. I would appreciate it if you added this info to future recipes!

    Reply
    • Thanks, Vanessa.

      Yes and in my recent experience, it’s not that you have to count them all the time, but doing a full day here and there calibrates my ‘how much is right for me’ meter ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  15. Thanks Russell! I am very grateful and appreciative for the recipes and all the information you share. I think the breakdown is useful. I don’t tend to count for the same reasons you shares, but pounds and inches do creep up and counting becomes a very useful technique and greatly appreciate the breakdown especially because it’s not usually available when you eat raw. I also think that it adds value to your already amazing, delicious recipes. And, by the way, what is this 12wk program your doing,? that really peeked my interest. Gracias.

    Reply
  16. Thanks! I love your recipes. I don’t always look at calories, but as I learn more about food I do find it helpful to see the nutritional information. It’s not the most important part for me, but it is helpful. I would like to use some of your recipes for my baby and so I am more interested now in calories, protein and fat as we are trying to keep her weight up, so I do find that helpful but not 100% necessary. I don’t mind looking up the nutritional info for individual foods on my own and can easily find it on line.

    Reply
  17. For me personally, it makes no difference, but I know some of my clients find it extremely valuable.
    Beautiful recipe with gorgeous photography, as usual!
    Much love & gratitude

    Reply
  18. It would be great if you could include fiber count with this–those of us who are counting things may want to know what our “impact carbs” are. Otherwise great recipe and thanks!

    Reply
  19. Hi there, I think having the macronutrients breakdown is really useful. I agree with the fact that we should focus on quality and not on the quantity of calories, However, calories are a fact of food. by knowing the calories you learn more about what you are eating. It would help teach people that more calories is not necessarily bad, and that in comparison with less nutritious food is even better.

    Also, not everybody is good at keeping their weight down or controlling food intake. Caloric input is a fact of life, is a reality of what we eat. When I started eating raw I would bring on kale and oil salads. Of course I gained weight instead of loosing it!

    I think you will be setting yourself apart from other raw speakers if you keep providing the information, you would be offering something that other rarely do.

    I truly appreciate that you do so and would surely serve my personal path on food and weight management.

    Reply
  20. Thanks – I really like to have the nutrient details although I am having to watch saturated fat intake so would love to have the fats broken down too……..

    Reply
  21. I was never a fan of counting calories as I felt and still feel it takes me away from my ultimate goal and that is too feel good, however having a macronutrient breakdown on these types of foods is GREAT, we don’t see them often on these types of recipes. It’s a great addition

    Reply
  22. Hi Russell, recipe looks great. I’m looking forward to trying it. I like the idea of the nutrients being list. I am a Type 1 diabetic and it takes out some of the guess work when I’m having to take my insulin. Thank you! Lois

    Reply
  23. I have a Type 1 Diabetic son, so carb counts are always appreciated! Thank you! (Utah, USA)

    Reply
  24. Hi Russell. Love your recipes. This one is so easy to make. The breakdown of calories helps as I am trying to maintain a low fat high carb lifestyle. Thanks.

    Reply
  25. Hi Russell, thanks very much for this info. I am going to use it to lose some weight ๐Ÿ˜‰
    I have a question about Coconut Butter, I can’t find that in my store in Germany.
    I only find Coconut Oil and I just found per Internet Bio-Kokosmus, Is this Mus the Butter you mind??
    Is it posible to do Coconut Butter?? Do you have a recipe?
    Thanks again for all elisa

    Reply
    • Hey Elisa, coconut oil is the fat, whereas coconut butter has some of the fibre too, so it’s sweeter and a little more solid. I’m not sure about that product you mentioned, but a good one to compare it to is Coconut Manna, which is Nutiva’s brand name for coconut butter.

      I have just started making my own coconut butter by putting dry coconut flakes or desiccated coconut into a stone grinder.

      Reply
  26. The nutritional info is interesting and helpful. It’s always good to be informed. I saw it made a big difference with adding the honey!
    What do you think of Lukanto, munk fruit sweetener as a sugar substitute? Where do you get it?
    Do you like Green Vibrance powder? What is your take on mixing fruit with other foods, since it digests more quickly than the other foods, and therefore can ferment and cause problems in the belly and gut, if eaten with other foods?

    Reply
    • I think Lukanto is fine if your main aim is to stay away from sugar.

      I’ve never heard of Green Vibrance powder.

      Ideally, I’d eat fruits away from other foods.

      Reply
  27. I also stopped counting calories when I began incorporating raw food into my diet (14 years ago) for the same reasons as you and just began counting calories etc again as of last month. I also just want to keep off this ten pounds that keeps creeping up on me ๐Ÿ™‚ I love flavored liquid stevia I learned about from your videos and stevia is great because it comes from a plant that naturally manages a persons blood sugar. I’m glad to know you are using Sun warrior protein powder (I think it’s made by David Wolfe isn’t it ?)I’m going to give it a try I’ve been using source naturals pea protein powder and trying to make my own version..So far, I haven’t been able to make a yummy one on my own. Protein powder is also a new item for me. Chalk it up to current collective consciousness!

    Reply
  28. I love reading other people’s recipes ๐Ÿ™‚
    I mostly always modify (except baked goods) so for me they are “guidelines”/ideas to use as a springboard.
    I always appreciate any additional information people offer – it shows care ๐Ÿ™‚
    While I do not find nutritional breakdowns necessary, for many it is so this additional info only serves to help others further.
    For those of us who do not need it or want it – we can just skip over it & be happy knowing others who do need/want it, have it!
    Cheers Russell!

    Reply
  29. Hi Russel, I don’t mind the nutritional breakdown, personally don’t need it but why not. But I’m a bit disappointed about the protein powder as well. And depending on which one you use from plain organic pea protein or sprouted brown rice protein to vanilla-flavoured-many-ingredients-combining-soy-lecithin-spoiled ones from the supermarket, the protein/carb/calories amount in your end product can vary wildly and makes the nutritional breakdown useless if you don’t use your specific product. I therefor would add those nutritional information as a rough number wherever you can, but not if products like powders are included, everybody will use a different one or none ;-).
    Best regards,
    Karina

    Reply
  30. I want to echo the others’ thanks and gratitude for your free information and recipes. Nutritional content is always valuable to have. People who don’t want to follow it can ignore it; but at least it will be there for people who are curious about the nutritional make-up of what they’re eating. It’s also helpful to point to when trying to convince others that a whole-foods, raw , vegan diet can be even healthier than the SAD (Standard American Diet) loaded with animal protein and highly processed ingredients.

    Keep up the fabulous work.

    Reply
  31. Hey Russell,

    To answer your primary question first, I am neutral about the stats being listed with each recipe, tho I think they will be helpful to many ALL the time, and to some others SOME of the time, and the people who are neutral won’t care, so I would suggest leaving them up. I think its awesome that you care enough to ask! ๐Ÿ™‚

    I think the recipe itself sounds really interesting (I’ve not yet tried chia seed as a “cereal”). One question is that can this dish be made with ground chia? I am not supposed to eat seeds or nuts or foods with tiny, sharp seeds (think strawberries and blueberries, etc.) because of diverticulitis (from the side-effects of gluten damage/auto-immune disorders). Anything “scratchy” further damages an already-inflamed gut. Any nuts or seeds I consume must be “soft”, so I am wondering just how soft the seeds get when one soaks them? Nuts I am considering trying would be something like pecans (rather soft to begin with, so soaking before using in a recipe “may” make them more digestible for those in my circumstance).

    Also, I am afraid of Maca. I have Atrial Fibrillation (again, from the results of gluten damage), and I have read that the Maca can make people “jittery”, possibly indicating a raise in heart rate or perhaps blood pressure??? I’ve looked up info on Maca and the info is rather disjointed. So, knowing that everybody is different, do you have any further insight as to how Maca affects people (even if its only about yourself)? In the meantime, I simply don’t use it. Also, I am certain that continuing my studies in raw “cooking” will cure these imbalances. so – as I am sure you already know – your courses are far more important than just making something that tastes good. Your work saves lives, and I am serious about that comment. I Love your website and Love your helpful attitude and upbeat outlook!! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
    • Hi Cheryl,

      Yes, you could certainly soak and then grind the chia seeds.

      For me, maca really feels good. It doesn’t make me jittery because it’s not a neuro stimulant like, for example, caffeine.

      Thanks so much for that, Cheryl. ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  32. This looks and sounds delicious, Russell!!! The breakdown does help me, but if I don’t have it, I can look them up for myself! Can’t wait to have this for breakfast tomorrow!!

    Reply
  33. For Grace (and everyone else). My wife is an Holistic Nurse and Certified Whole Health Educator who also sells nutrition products. She recommends Biopharma Scientific supplements and they offer an awesome vegan protein superfood called nanopro vegan. I am vegan, but not totally a raw food eater and have been taking nanopro vegan for a couple of years. I do resistance training 6 days a week and also run 3-4 miles about 3-4 days per week and I’m 55 years old and have actually gained muscle as I’ve aged. Check out the Biopharma website. They have excellent products. Hope this helps. By the way, my wife is not vegan or strictly vegetarian (she eats a small amount of organic meat), and uses the nanopro whey protein. Thanks Russell for your great recipes and information. Neal

    Reply
  34. I love your progression Russell adding the macronutrient breakdown information adds finishing touches to your recipes

    Reply
  35. hi Russell: Awesome recipe! Thank you. Can you share what program you use to create the nutrient breakdown of the recipes.

    Reply
  36. Seems pretty straightforward, and I like the fact that looks familiar resembling a porridge. Only concern, maca is considered toxic when consumed raw, Plus stevia and protein powder are processed, higlhly refined foods that are not much different than any other boxed, manufactured food-like product on the market. Just saying, there is nothing natural in them, and our bodies are not really designed to eat these kind of highly refined foods.

    Reply
    • Thanks, Fabio.

      Yeah, it’s a personal choice with the stevia and protein powders. I would definitely say there’s a difference between Sunwarrior and stevia, and other processed, packaged foods though. I just don’t think they’re in the same category as most of the things you’d find in a conventional supermarket.

      I actually don’t eat raw maca, I used the gelatinised version. Thanks for pointing that out, I’ll definitely mention it next time.

      Reply
      • Hey Russell, can you explain the raw maca thing, why is it toxic and what is gelatinised maca?
        Thanks
        Suzi

        Reply
        • I’m not sure about toxicity of raw maca, but the way I see it is that when maca is used in its native Peru, it’s baked or roasted. I think it’s best to follow the wisdom of those traditions that have been around for thousands of years, than to decide that it might be better raw.

          The gelatinised maca has had the starch removed, so it is easier to digest and assimilate.

          Reply
    • Maca is considered toxic when consumed raw? What about the Maca powder promoted in every superfood book and raw food cook book and those which are offered everywhere? I have never heard anything about that before and it feels quite shocking. Can you please tell me more about that? And Russell, you said something about a gelatinised version of Maca…
      can explain that too please? Thanks a lot!

      Reply
      • Hi Irina, I don’t think maca is toxic when eaten raw, that was something Pablo said. As far as I know, it’s an opinion, not a fact.

        I do think maca is best eaten cooked though, because that’s how it’s been done traditionally for years in Peru (roasted or baked). Gelatinised maca has had the starch removed and so is easier to digest and assimilate.

        Reply
        • Dear Russell, Tranks a Lot for your comment regarding Maca. Would you like to reveal, where to buy the gelatinious version / brand Name so that I can test it (powder vs. gelatinious ), your recommandations are always very good and helpful ( e. g. your recommandation regarding a good food processor from cuisinart)? Thanks a lot in advance!

          Reply
  37. Hi Russell, I love you dearly but Sunwarrior protein, really? LOL You food/recipes are outstanding, you are my favorite chef but Sunwarrior…I am disappointed.. haha ..you have such a good taste..LOL ok, ok…I will stop now…as you can probably tell by now it’s not my thing…one of the Ladies above said that she can’t find a good vegan protein to like in her food..and I totally agree. The only one that taste amazing I know it’s unfortunately whey…but I use sometimes vegan BOKU and it’s so far the best vegan one I tried. I am around 90-95% plant base raw for last 10 years but must say the vegan protein it’s the only struggle for me..
    Anyway counting fats, carbs, fats, sugars etc for me it’s very important as I train 6 days a week and I am not counting them too much but trying to see if it looks a lot that means no good for me…but it really helps to see what is the break down…specially sugars. People don’t realize that even fresh fruit counts as sugar and I am not saying they are bad just at certain time of a day not recommended like before you go to bed..
    Thank you for great recipes and good luck with your training…and I am sure your girlfriend will appreciate extra muscle ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
    • Hahaha, I guess I’m out there alone with liking Sunwarrior ๐Ÿ™‚

      I have delved into whey too, which is very nice, but even though I’ve never seen myself as vegan, I do feel conflicted about it. I’ll def check out BOKU.

      Reply
      • Nope, not alone. Sunwarrior is my raw protein powder of choice. Chocolate flavour is my usual one and I admit I did buy the Vanilla one the other day and winced when I tasted it made up with coconut milk (not pleasant, so will need to experiment with that flavour) but the Choc one definitely tastes nice to me.

        Reply
  38. As someone with a history of disordered eating and obsessive calorie counting I have worked hard to stop paying attention to this information and appreciate the fact that most raw food blogs don’t post it. I’m trying to reach my weight goals without counting – just appreciating te beauty of knowing I’m eating whole, vegan foods that have a positive impact on me and the world.
    This isn’t meant to be a criticism just an input from someone who is not in an ideal place with weight but also doesn’t want calorie counts. Raw food does sometimes attract those struggling with anorexia/orthorexia.

    Reply
  39. Yummm…made it this morning and so soooo good. Thanks for sharing..this was the first email I saw this morning!
    I had to start watching my protein intake too. I started working out intensely and feeling better with a little more protein. I was the same and didn’t believe in all the calorie counting but I am finding it interesting watching macros.
    I have to admit…I like to drink my protein powder separate. Lol. I haven’t found one that doesn’t ruin the dish for me. So I had the chia pudding without it and it was amazing. ????

    Reply
  40. Yes, please continue to provide this info, I feel it is important to have, especially when trying to follow a diet.

    Reply
  41. This is great, myself and my husband are Personal trainers, and i try to eat raw 60/80% of the time( i also juice a lot) we get lots of questions from our clients about raw eating and calories. The thing is like Lisa above said about losing the muscle, my husband finds he does lose a lot of muscle mass when eating raw so would be fantastic to have this info that you have given. It would be great Russell if you put a weight gain and weight loss fitness food program together ๐Ÿ™‚

    Reply
  42. Dear Russell,
    first of all: thanks you very much for providing us with your fantastic recipes, information and other extras, I enjoy every mail from you. Please continue with the additional information of macronutrients. This is in fact very helpful if you keep an eye on carbs in your daily diet in order to keep the blood sugar level down.
    Nearly everybody likes to loose weight, belly fat and likes to build more muscular mass. So every information given to achieve those goals is indeed helpful…;-)… and more than welcome.

    Reply
  43. Thanks Russell
    that info is really useful , I am always lookign at the nutrient content , an dcalories useful also.

    Reply
  44. I cant wait to try this recipe!! I need to find toffee stevia, I really enjoy seeing the break down because on my journey towards optimal health I am looking forward to reducing my amount of body fat . I find this really great to see so I have a better understanding. I have had some health issues and I have been incorporating more and more Raw foods into my diet. I am taking one of your on line courses and I absolutely love it! I am looking forward to learning much much more! Thank you for contributing to my wellness and the wellness of so many!!

    Reply
  45. Russell: What is your process for obtaining the nutrient values, if I wanted to do this for my own recipes. I tend to agree with you that even though all nutrients are available from plant foods and “there is more protein per calorie in broccoli than steak” one needs to be aware of obtaining daily “sufficient” fats and “substantial” protein sources.

    Reply
    • I think you’re right, Patsy.

      Even that thing about broccoli and steak isn’t actually useful. Because broccoli doesn’t have the amino acids steak has, plus you’d have to eat a massive amount of broccoli to get anywhere near those calories. That’s not to say you can’t get your protein from plants, it’s just that steak Vs broccoli gets used as a misleading example.

      Reply
  46. Thanks for posting the macros it is important for me to see the macro breakdown . I’m a physique athlete so counting calories and knowing my Marco breakdown is important so if I have to adjust a recipe to fit my goals I can . I won’t actually look at a recipe unless it has the breakdown. I will try this but will cut back on the fats. I find slot of raw cooking is very high fat and when you are trying to loose weight or even maintain a ripped physique that’s a macro that needs to be lower.
    Thanks for posting !

    Reply
    • Thanks, Trish. That’s really interesting.

      I’m working with a nutritional therapist that works with people that need to bulk up or cut down in a really quick time period, for films and such. He’s got me getting most of my calories from fat, then protein and then a few carbs. One thing I’ve realised is that everyone is so different. Getting calories from fat works for me. But a friend who is doing a similar thing with me has to keep fat low.

      My girlfriend who is a yoga teacher seems to be able to do well with plenty of carbs and she’s really low in body fat.

      Thanks for stopping by ๐Ÿ™‚

      Reply
  47. I like the nutritional info added. More for the nutrients than for the calories, but anyway, I hope you continue to add them. Thanks for all your free info. I would be interested in what you are doing for your 12 week program. About 5 years ago my husband and I did mostly raw food for a year and he is a laborer, a roofer. We should have kept a closer eye on his nutritional balance as he dropped about 15 pounds and a lot of it was muscle. Probably because he wasn’t eating enough and I think he needed some more cocentrated protein, like Sunwarrior or other. He fell off the roof during that time and was unable to do much for several weeks and has never regained his previous strength. Thanks again, Lisa

    Reply
    • Hey Lisa, thanks so much for sharing. Yes, if there’s one thing I’ve learnt it’s that some people do really need to watch their protein intake. By that I mean, there this idea that, “I get enough amino acids from all my foods and protein isn’t a problem” around veggies and vegans. It’s totally possible to get all your nutrients from plants, but it has to be well planned and measured.

      Reply
  48. Yes, please continue to provide this info, I feel it is important to have, especially when trying to follow a diet.

    Reply

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